Workforce 2015: Strategy Trumps Shortage

For the past several decades, the U.S. labor pool has grown rapidly as increased numbers of women and “baby boomers” of both genders joined the workforce, and as the relatively small number of persons born during the Great Depression retired. The future looks much different… Health care will face the twin challenges of attracting and retaining replacements for retiring workers while expanding its workforce to care for an aging population.

Dreaming The American Dream: Once More Around On Physician Workforce Policy

For more than half a century the devotees of public health planning in the United States have dreamed of planning the size, composition, and spatial distribution of the nation’s physician work-force so that it can meet the projected “need” for health services in an efficient and equitable manner. Undaunted by a century of failure in this regard, Kevin Grumbach’s paper, “Fighting Hand to Hand over Physician Workforce Policy,” is one more installment of this perpetual American dream. His paper leads one to wonder whether the planning he advocates could ever work—anywhere.

The Last Mile: The Role of HPM in Rounding Out the Enterprise Human Resource Management Mission

Active management of healthcare delivery and cost control has not typically been seen as an integral part of the mission for human resource (HR) departments. But changing times — and skyrocketing costs — have pushed healthcare performance management (HPM) center stage for companies that want to boost productivity, while investing benefits dollars in better health outcomes for their employees.

This shift away from traditional ways of managing employee health benefits stems from a clear and universal reality: rising healthcare costs increasingly pose a core business challenge.

Retain your Health Care Specialists in a Changing Economy

Through the deep recession of 2008-2009, healthcare employers could pretty well count on their workers to stay put, even clinical specialists in particularly high demand. But with the economy on the mend, some health care professionals inevitably will start to look for greener pastures. That’s why executives and managers at hospitals and other health care providers are renewing their efforts to retain those hard-to-replace specialists in whom they’ve invested substantial resources.

Greening Healthcare, a New Opportunity for Engaging Employees

Employee retention and recruitment may seem like the same concept, but each require a very different approach to be successful. With recruiting, the approach is one of educating potential employees about your organization and the benefits of working there. Often this is focused on salary and benefits, with other factors such as working conditions, location, scheduling. However in the last decade, an organization’s green performance has started to become more important and is a contributing factor in attracting new top talent.

AHA Establishes New Award To Recognize Leadership In Health Care Quality Improvement

The AHA announces the new Dick Davidson Quality Milestone Award to recognize state, regional and metropolitan hospital associations’ leadership in improving health care quality. The award will be presented annually to a hospital association that demonstrates leadership and innovation in quality improvement and contributes to national health care improvement efforts.

March a Record Month for Healthcare Jobs

In March healthcare added another 37,000 jobs – the most so far this year, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics…. Even with the new jobs being created, healthcare – like other fields – needs to be carefully considered before a potential employee accepts a job.

Charge Nurse Leadership Development Leads to Significant Annual Savings

The chief nursing officer (CNO) of this 250-bed, for-profit hospital wanted to improve the quality of care and physician satisfaction in her patient care units. She felt that one of the best strategies to effectively address these issues was to further develop and improve her charge nurses’ skills and job performance.

Building a High-Reliability Culture

The missing link is far deeper than protocols and checklists, albeit these tools are a vital component in keeping our patients safe. The missing link is the absence of a true culture of safety within our organizations. If we are going to live up to the trust that patients place in us, we must first consider our own core behaviors, acknowledge our failures and then intentionally build an environment where safety is the cornerstone value.

Building a High-Reliability Culture

Changing the culture in a hospital is not for the weak of heart, but we should also realize that we are not blazing new territory. We can look to industries such as naval aviation, nuclear power, commercial airlines and nuclear submarines for examples of culture change and the development of safety as a core value.