Are You Examining Your Compensation Practices? 5 Questions to Get You Started

Are you statistically examining your compensation practices? If not, you should be, because someone else will. And that someone else just might be the Federal Government…. It’s important to know what story can be told by your data. The best way to find out is to statistically examine it. Not only will this help you prepare for what the government may find when they analyze your data, it will provide you with an opportunity to identify potential problem areas, and give you a chance to take corrective action where appropriate.

Nursing Leadership from Bedside to Boardroom: Opinion Leaders’ Perceptions

The objective of this study was to examine views of nursing and nursing leadership among the nation’s opinion
leaders. A recent survey, conducted November 20-22, 2009, found the American public rating nurses with the
highest honesty and ethical standards, at 83%. Gallup has historically found nurses to be among the most
ethical and honest professions, as rated by the public. This study sought to examine opinion leaders’ views
about nursing leadership with an emphasis on determining the role of nursing in the future, and potential
barriers to leadership roles in healthcare today.

Workforce 2015: Strategy Trumps Shortage

For the past several decades, the U.S. labor pool has grown rapidly as increased numbers of women and “baby boomers” of both genders joined the workforce, and as the relatively small number of persons born during the Great Depression retired. The future looks much different… Health care will face the twin challenges of attracting and retaining replacements for retiring workers while expanding its workforce to care for an aging population.

Dreaming The American Dream: Once More Around On Physician Workforce Policy

For more than half a century the devotees of public health planning in the United States have dreamed of planning the size, composition, and spatial distribution of the nation’s physician work-force so that it can meet the projected “need” for health services in an efficient and equitable manner. Undaunted by a century of failure in this regard, Kevin Grumbach’s paper, “Fighting Hand to Hand over Physician Workforce Policy,” is one more installment of this perpetual American dream. His paper leads one to wonder whether the planning he advocates could ever work—anywhere.

Wellness Study Puts Price Tag on Unhealthy Behavior

Everyone knows unhealthy behaviors can be costly. Now some of those costs have been calculated into dollars. The Thomson Reuters Workforce Wellness Index estimates that employers spend an average of $670 annually per employee on medical care and pharmacy around six behavioral risk factors, with the top cost drivers identified as: Obesity /body mass index ($400), High blood sugar ($150), Tobacco use ($100).

Bridging the Gaps (Healthcare IT)

Ryan Champlin, vice president of operations for the physician network at the Cook Children’s Health Care System in Fort Worth, Texas, isn’t prone to hyperbole. But when it comes to practical implications of the athenahealth-Microsoft partnership that was announced at HIMSS11 in February, he can’t help it.

“People get mad at me for being so excited about this,” said Champlin, “but, honestly, this is the holy grail of health data.”

Retain your Health Care Specialists in a Changing Economy

Through the deep recession of 2008-2009, healthcare employers could pretty well count on their workers to stay put, even clinical specialists in particularly high demand. But with the economy on the mend, some health care professionals inevitably will start to look for greener pastures. That’s why executives and managers at hospitals and other health care providers are renewing their efforts to retain those hard-to-replace specialists in whom they’ve invested substantial resources.

Charge Nurse Leadership Development Leads to Significant Annual Savings

The chief nursing officer (CNO) of this 250-bed, for-profit hospital wanted to improve the quality of care and physician satisfaction in her patient care units. She felt that one of the best strategies to effectively address these issues was to further develop and improve her charge nurses’ skills and job performance.

Building a High-Reliability Culture

The missing link is far deeper than protocols and checklists, albeit these tools are a vital component in keeping our patients safe. The missing link is the absence of a true culture of safety within our organizations. If we are going to live up to the trust that patients place in us, we must first consider our own core behaviors, acknowledge our failures and then intentionally build an environment where safety is the cornerstone value.