Are You Examining Your Compensation Practices? 5 Questions to Get You Started

Are you statistically examining your compensation practices? If not, you should be, because someone else will. And that someone else just might be the Federal Government…. It’s important to know what story can be told by your data. The best way to find out is to statistically examine it. Not only will this help you prepare for what the government may find when they analyze your data, it will provide you with an opportunity to identify potential problem areas, and give you a chance to take corrective action where appropriate.

Behind the Numbers: Medical cost trends for 2012

This year’s report from PwC’s Health Research Institute finds that the medical cost trend is expected to increase from 8% in 2011 to 8.5% in 2012. An interesting blend of reactions to the recession, the slow recovery, health reform, and other variables are factored into the medical cost trend in 2012. The report shares key findings, which includes an explanation of trends contributing to rising costs (accelerators) as well as decreasing cost trends (deflators).

Dreaming The American Dream: Once More Around On Physician Workforce Policy

For more than half a century the devotees of public health planning in the United States have dreamed of planning the size, composition, and spatial distribution of the nation’s physician work-force so that it can meet the projected “need” for health services in an efficient and equitable manner. Undaunted by a century of failure in this regard, Kevin Grumbach’s paper, “Fighting Hand to Hand over Physician Workforce Policy,” is one more installment of this perpetual American dream. His paper leads one to wonder whether the planning he advocates could ever work—anywhere.

The Last Mile: The Role of HPM in Rounding Out the Enterprise Human Resource Management Mission

Active management of healthcare delivery and cost control has not typically been seen as an integral part of the mission for human resource (HR) departments. But changing times — and skyrocketing costs — have pushed healthcare performance management (HPM) center stage for companies that want to boost productivity, while investing benefits dollars in better health outcomes for their employees.

This shift away from traditional ways of managing employee health benefits stems from a clear and universal reality: rising healthcare costs increasingly pose a core business challenge.

Wellness Study Puts Price Tag on Unhealthy Behavior

Everyone knows unhealthy behaviors can be costly. Now some of those costs have been calculated into dollars. The Thomson Reuters Workforce Wellness Index estimates that employers spend an average of $670 annually per employee on medical care and pharmacy around six behavioral risk factors, with the top cost drivers identified as: Obesity /body mass index ($400), High blood sugar ($150), Tobacco use ($100).

Bridging the Gaps (Healthcare IT)

Ryan Champlin, vice president of operations for the physician network at the Cook Children’s Health Care System in Fort Worth, Texas, isn’t prone to hyperbole. But when it comes to practical implications of the athenahealth-Microsoft partnership that was announced at HIMSS11 in February, he can’t help it.

“People get mad at me for being so excited about this,” said Champlin, “but, honestly, this is the holy grail of health data.”

Retain your Health Care Specialists in a Changing Economy

Through the deep recession of 2008-2009, healthcare employers could pretty well count on their workers to stay put, even clinical specialists in particularly high demand. But with the economy on the mend, some health care professionals inevitably will start to look for greener pastures. That’s why executives and managers at hospitals and other health care providers are renewing their efforts to retain those hard-to-replace specialists in whom they’ve invested substantial resources.

The Right Hire

Consider more than personality to make sure you choose the best fit for the position at hand. Your new employee has been on the job for 6 weeks now, and you’ve realized that, unfortunately, you hired the wrong person for the job. Her personality isn’t meshing well with her other coworkers, she isn’t working as fast as she should be and she just doesn’t seem like she wants to be there.